Update on Antifreeze Systems

NFPA Issues New Decisions on Antifreeze Systems

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has issued new TIAs 10-2 regarding the use of antifreeze for NFPA 13D/13R/13 and TIA 11-1 for NFPA 25, all of which have an effective date of March 21, 2011.

The 10-2 TIAs replace the August 2010 TIAs (10-1), which imposed a moratorium on the use of antifreeze in dwelling units. The 10-2 TIAs include two major changes.

  1. Antifreeze compounds are allowed in new sprinkler systems with the following conditions:
    • Only glycerin and propylene glycol can be used
      1. Glycerin can be up to 48 percent by volume
      2. Propylene glycol can be up to 38 percent by volume.
    • Only factory premixed solutions can be usedThese concentrations provide freeze protection levels down to approximately -16°F for glycerin and -3°F for propylene glycol.
  2. These changes apply to all installations and not just those in dwelling units.
    • Additionally, a TIA on NFPA 25 (TIA 11-1) was released that places similar restrictions on the use of antifreeze in existing systems. If the system meets the following two conditions, when tested at multiple locations, it can remain in use.
      1. The antifreeze compound can be positively identified and is either glycerin or propylene glycol.
      2. The concentration does not exceed 50 percent by volume for glycerin and 40 percent by volume for propylene glycol and does not require modification.

If for any reason the solution must be replaced or modified, then one must drain the system and use factory premixed solutions at the 48 percent and 38 percent maximum concentrations, respectively.

The new TIAs as well as the Standards Council decision can be found on the NFPA’s Web site at:

For additional information as it comes available, watch the “Latest News” section at www.firesprinkler.org/.

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  • Update on Antifreeze Systems

    The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has issued new TIAs 10-2 regarding the use of antifreeze for NFPA 13D/13R/13 and TIA 11-1 for NFPA 25, all of which have an effective date of March 21, 2011.
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